NASA’s Mission to Touch the Sun Arrives in the Sunshine State

Posted on 04/06/2018 09:30:18

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe has arrived in Florida to begin final preparations for its launch to the Sun, scheduled for July 31, 2018.

In the middle of the night on April 2, the spacecraft was driven from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to nearby Joint Base Andrews in Maryland. From there, it was flown by the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing to Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, where it arrived at 10:40 a.m. EDT. It was then transported a short distance to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, where it will continue testing, and eventually undergo final assembly and mating to the third stage of the Delta IV Heavy launch vehicle.

Parker Solar Probe is humanity’s first mission to the Sun. After launch, it will orbit directly through the solar atmosphere – the corona – closer to the surface than any human-made object has ever gone. While facing brutal heat and radiation, the mission will reveal fundamental science behind what drives the solar wind, the constant outpouring of material from the Sun that shapes planetary atmospheres and affects space weather near Earth.

“Parker Solar Probe and the team received a smooth ride from the Air Force C-17 crew from the 436th,” said Andy Driesman, Parker Solar Probe project manager from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. “This is the second most important flight Parker Solar Probe will make, and we’re excited to be safely in Florida and continuing pre-launch work on the spacecraft.”

At Astrotech, Parker Solar Probe was taken to a clean room and removed from its protective shipping container on Wednesday, April 4. The spacecraft then began a series of tests to verify that it had safely made the journey to Florida. For the next several months, the spacecraft will undergo comprehensive testing; just prior to being fueled, one of the most critical elements of the spacecraft, the thermal protection system (TPS), or heat shield, will be installed. The TPS is the breakthrough technology that will allow Parker Solar Probe to survive the temperatures in the Sun’s corona, just 3.8 million miles from the surface of our star.

“There are many milestones to come for Parker Solar Probe and the amazing team of men and women who have worked so diligently to make this mission a reality,” said Driesman. “The installation of the TPS will be our final major step before encapsulation and integration onto the launch vehicle.”

Parker Solar Probe will be launched from Launch Complex-37 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The two-hour launch window opens at approximately 4 a.m. EDT on July 31, 2018, and is repeated each day (at slightly earlier times) through August 19.

Throughout its seven-year mission, Parker Solar Probe will explore the Sun's outer atmosphere and make critical observations to answer decades-old questions about the physics of stars. Its data will also be useful in improving forecasts of major eruptions on the Sun and the subsequent space weather events that impact technology on Earth, as well as satellites and astronauts in space. The mission is named for University of Chicago Professor Emeritus Eugene N. Parker, whose profound insights into solar physics and processes have guided the discipline. It is the first NASA mission named for a living individual.


Parker Solar Probe is part of NASA’s Living With a Star Program to explore aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that directly affect life and society. Living With a Star is managed by the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Johns Hopkins APL designed, built, and manages the mission for NASA. Instrument teams are led by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.; Princeton University in New Jersey; and the Smithsonian Astrophysics Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

United Launch Alliance of Centennial, Colorado, is the provider of the Delta IV launch service for Parker Solar Probe. NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP), based at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, manages the agency’s efforts to commercially provide rockets for specific missions. LSP also directs the overall launch effort including overseeing development and integration of the rocket with the spacecraft.

To learn more about Parker Solar Probe, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe



Media Contacts

Dwayne Brown

NASA Headquarters, Washington

202-358-1726
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

Geoff Brown

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
240-228-5618

geoffrey.brown@jhuapl.edu

Karen Fox

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
301-286-6284

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov


Parker Solar Probe project scientist Nicky Fox of Johns Hopkins APL describes the spacecraft's journey to Florida and arrival at Astrotech Space Operations, the probe's new home before a scheduled launch on July 31, 2018 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Lee Hobson

Parker Solar Probe – wrapped in protective plastic – is shown on March 29, 2018, as the lid is lowered onto its shipping container at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The spacecraft is shipped on its side to allow for more easy transport and to avoid height-related obstacles such as bridges. From Goddard, the probe was taken by truck to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland and flown to Florida aboard a United States Air Force C-17.

Parker Solar Probe – wrapped in protective plastic – is shown on March 29, 2018, as the lid is lowered onto its shipping container at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The spacecraft is shipped on its side to allow for more easy transport and to avoid height-related obstacles such as bridges. From Goddard, the probe was taken by truck to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland and flown to Florida aboard a United States Air Force C-17.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

Inside its protective shipping container, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is loaded into a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in the early morning of April 3, 2018. From Joint Base Andrews, the spacecraft was flown to Titusville, Florida, where it was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.

Inside its protective shipping container, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is loaded into a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in the early morning of April 3, 2018. From Joint Base Andrews, the spacecraft was flown to Titusville, Florida, where it was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Jeffrey Fiske
High-Res Image

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, inside a protective shipping container, is loaded into a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in the early morning of April 3, 2018. From Joint Base Andrews, the spacecraft was flown to Titusville, Florida, where it was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, inside a protective shipping container, is loaded into a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in the early morning of April 3, 2018. From Joint Base Andrews, the spacecraft was flown to Titusville, Florida, where it was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Jeffrey Fiske
High-Res Image

Sitting inside a custom-made protective shipping container, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is loaded into a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in the early morning of April 3, 2018. From Joint Base Andrews, the spacecraft was flown to Titusville, Florida, where it was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.

Sitting inside a custom-made protective shipping container, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is loaded into a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in the early morning of April 3, 2018. From Joint Base Andrews, the spacecraft was flown to Titusville, Florida, where it was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Jeffrey Fiske
High-Res Image

A C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing, carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, approaches for landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After landing, the spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.

A C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing, carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, approaches for landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After landing, the spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

A C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing, carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, lands at 10:40 a.m. EDT at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After landing, the spacecraft was unloaded and taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

A C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing, carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, lands at 10:40 a.m. EDT at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After landing, the spacecraft was unloaded and taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

The C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe taxis after landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After landing, the spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

The C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe taxis after landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After landing, the spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

After landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018, equipment is unloaded from the C-17 – from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing – carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe. The spacecraft was later taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

After landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018, equipment is unloaded from the C-17 – from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing – carrying NASA’s Parker Solar Probe. The spacecraft was later taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

The custom shipping container holding NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is prepared for unloading from the C-17 of the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing after landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. The spacecraft was then taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

The custom shipping container holding NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is prepared for unloading from the C-17 of the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing after landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. The spacecraft was then taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

Securely packed in its custom transport container, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is unloaded from the C-17 of the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing after landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After unloading, the spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

Securely packed in its custom transport container, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is unloaded from the C-17 of the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing after landing at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. After unloading, the spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is unloaded by forklift from the C-17 of the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing after arriving at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. The spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is unloaded by forklift from the C-17 of the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing after arriving at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018. The spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is loaded aboard a truck after being flown to Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018, by a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing. The spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is loaded aboard a truck after being flown to Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida, on the morning of April 3, 2018, by a C-17 from the United States Air Force’s 436th Airlift Wing. The spacecraft was taken to Astrotech Space Operations, also in Titusville, for pre-launch testing and preparations.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is carefully moved into a high-bay clean room facility at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, for pre-launch testing and preparations. On April 3, 2018, the spacecraft was transported from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to Joint Base Andrews by truck, then by a United States Air Force C-17 to Titusville.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is carefully moved into a high-bay clean room facility at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, for pre-launch testing and preparations. On April 3, 2018, the spacecraft was transported from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to Joint Base Andrews by truck, then by a United States Air Force C-17 to Titusville.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

Protected by special plastic sheeting, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is wheeled into a clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, for pre-launch testing and preparations. On April 3, 2018, the spacecraft was transported from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to Joint Base Andrews by truck, then by a United States Air Force C-17 to Titusville.

Protected by special plastic sheeting, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is wheeled into a clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, for pre-launch testing and preparations. On April 3, 2018, the spacecraft was transported from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to Joint Base Andrews by truck, then by a United States Air Force C-17 to Titusville.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is wheeled into position in a clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, for pre-launch testing and preparations. On April 3, 2018, the spacecraft was transported from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to Joint Base Andrews by truck, then by a United States Air Force C-17 to Titusville.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is wheeled into position in a clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Florida, for pre-launch testing and preparations. On April 3, 2018, the spacecraft was transported from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to Joint Base Andrews by truck, then by a United States Air Force C-17 to Titusville.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Ed Whitman
High-Res Image


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